John Harwood

John Harwood is Editor at Large for CNBC covering Washington and hosts the CNBC Digital original video series “Speakeasy with John Harwood.”

Harwood was born in Louisville, Kentucky, and grew up in the Maryland suburbs outside of the nation’s capital. He has been around journalism and politics all his life; his first trip on a presidential campaign press plane came when he was 11 years old and accompanied his father, then a political reporter for The Washington Post.

While still in high school, he began his journalism career as a copy boy at The Washington Star. He studied history and economics at Duke University and graduated magna cum laude in 1978. Harwood subsequently joined The St. Petersburg Times, reporting on police, investigative projects, local government and politics. Later he became state capital correspondent in Tallahassee, Washington correspondent and political editor. While covering national politics, he also traveled extensively to South Africa, where he covered deepening unrest against the apartheid regime.

In 1989, Harwood was named a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where he spent the 1989-90 academic year. In 1991, he joined The Wall Street Journal as White House correspondent, covering the administration of George H. W. Bush. Later Harwood reported on Congress. In 1997, he became The Wall Street Journal’s political editor and chief political correspondent.

While at The Wall Street Journal, Harwood wrote the newspaper’s political column, “Washington Wire,” and oversaw the Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll. In March 2006, he joined CNBC as Chief Washington Correspondent.

In addition to CNBC, Harwood offers political analysis on NBC and NPR, among others. Harwood has covered each of the last nine presidential elections.

Myk Watford

Myk was raised in the Muscle Shoals, area of North Alabama. He attended the University of Utah, under the tutelage of Kenneth H. Washington, and studied at The Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, D.C.

You’ve probably seen Myk on just about every cop show on TV, most notably a recurring stint on “Law & Order: SVU”, as well the all the “CSI’s”, “NCIS’s”, and every other procedural using acronyms. Other notable TV work include “Breaking Bad, True Blood, Justified, Longmire, Scandal, just to name a few.

In 2019, Myk will first be seen in Season 3 of the hit HBO series, True Detective: Season 3 with Marhershala Ali (Oscar Winner for Moonlight) as well as guest starring roles on CBS’ hit show “Elementary”, and Fox’s “Lethal Weapon”. This Summer, we will see Myk as “Little Jackie” in the highly anticipated big screen adaptation of DC/Vertigo Comics “The Kitchen”, alongside Melissa McCarthy, Elisabeth Moss and Tiffany Haddish. Myk is also known for his previous feature endeavors in movies like “No Country For Old Men”, “Spider-Man”, “Trailer Park of Terror” and “NY Prison Break”.

Myk was classically trained, and has appeared in over a hundred theatrical productions, including numerous Broadway and Off Broadway hits such as “Take Me Out”, “Hank Williams; Lost Highway”, “The Good Negro” “Five By Tenn” and many, many more.

Myk is also a musician, and when he is not on set, you can often find him rocking the Hollywood scene with his popular swamp-rockabilly-revival band “Stumpwaller”.

Bruce Gray

Most Canadians would know Bruce Gray as the star of the TV series Traders (Gemini Award), but most Americans would recognize him as the Father of the groom in My Big Fat Greek Wedding. Although he began his acting career on stage in the 60s, he quickly moved into daytime dramas: contracted to Somerset, High Hopes and the Edge of Night in the 70’s. A move to Hollywood in the 80s led to guest star roles on hundreds of TV shows, recurring on Murder She Wrote, Medium, Tour of Duty, Falling Skies, How I met your Mother. Bruce gained notoriety in the gay community as “Shickle The Pickle” on Queer As Folk, then for football fans by playing a team owner on Playmakers for ESPN.

Bob Prince

Robert Ferris Prince was an American radio and television sportscaster and commentator best known for his 28-year stint as the voice of the Pittsburgh Pirates Major League Baseball club, with whom he earned the nickname “The Gunner” and became a cultural icon in Pittsburgh.

Prince was one of the most distinct and popular voices in sports broadcast history, known for his gravel voice, unabashed style and clever nicknames and phrases, which came to be known as “Gunnerisms.” His unique manner influenced a number of broadcasters after him, including Pittsburgh Penguins voice Mike Lange and Pittsburgh Steelers color analyst Myron Cope.

Prince called Pirates games from 1948 to 1975, including the World Series championship years of 1960 and 1971. Nationally, Prince broadcast the 1960, 1966, and 1971 World Series and the 1965 All-Star Game for NBC, as well as the first year (1976) of ABC’s Monday Night Baseball. He also broadcast at different times for other Pittsburgh-area sports teams, including Steelers football and Penguins hockey.

Grantland Rice

Phi Delta Theta Sports Hall of Fame Inductee

Grantland Rice was a sports writer and poet whose columns became nationally syndicated beginning in 1930. Rice is known as the Dean of American Sports Writers and the most famous sports writer in America during the first half of the 20th century. His poetry included Alumni Football, which ends with the lines: “For when the One Great Scorer comes to write against your name, He marks not that you won or lost, but how you played the game.”

To honor his 50 years in journalism, the Grantland Rice Fellowship in Journalism was established with the New York Community Trust in 1951. In 1954, the Football Writers Association established the Grantland Rice Memorial Award given to an outstanding college player chosen by the association. The Grantland Rice Bowl, a college bowl game named in his honor, was played from 1964 to 1977. He received the J.G. Taylor Spink Award posthumously in 1966 from the Baseball Writers Association of America for meritorious contributions to baseball writing.

Today, the Fred Russell-Grantland Rice Sports Writing Scholarship provides a partial tuition scholarship to an entering Vanderbilt student interested in the field of sports journalism.

Harry Kalas

Harry Norbert Kalas was an American sportscaster, best known for his Ford C. Frick Award-winning role as lead play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseball’s Philadelphia Phillies, a position he held from 1971 until his death in 2009.

Kalas was also closely identified with the National Football League, serving as a voice-over narrator for NFL Films productions (a regular feature on Inside the NFL) and calling football games nationally for Westwood One radio.

Kalas collapsed in the Washington Nationals’ broadcast booth on April 13, 2009, about an hour before a Phillies game was scheduled to begin against the Nationals, and died soon afterward.

Sam Simon

Simon was an American director, producer, writer, animal rights activist, boxing manager, tournament poker player, and philanthropist, most noted as co-creator of the television series The Simpsons. In 1989, Simon developed the animated sitcom The Simpsons with Matt Groening and James L. Brooks. Simon assembled the show’s first writing team, co-wrote eight episodes and has been credited with “developing [the show’s] sensibility”.

Simon’s relationship with Groening was strained and he left the show in 1993, negotiating a pay-off which saw him receive tens of millions of dollars from the show’s revenue each year. The following year Simon co-created The George Carlin Show, before later working as a director on shows such as The Drew Carey Show. Simon won nine Primetime Emmy Awards for his television work.

Don Simpson

Donald Clarence “Don” Simpson was an American film producer, screenwriter, and actor. In the early 1970s, Simpson moved to Los Angeles and got a job marketing exploitation films for Warner Bros. In 1973, Simpson got a job at Paramount Pictures. While there, he co-wrote the 1976 film Cannonball, in which he also had a small role. By 1981, he was named president of production at Paramount. Simpson left Paramount in 1982 and forged a partnership with fellow producer Jerry Bruckheimer. The two would go on to produce some of the most financially successful films of the 1980s: Flashdance (1983), Beverly Hills Cop (1984), Top Gun (1986) and Beverly Hills Cop II (1987). In 1985 and again in 1988, he and his producing partner, Jerry Bruckheimer, were named Producers of the Year by the National Association of Theatre Owners.

In 1990, Simpson and Bruckheimer signed a five-year deal with Paramount worth a reported $300 million. The deal would prove to be short lived. Later that year, the Simpson and Bruckner-produced Days of Thunder starring Tom Cruise was released. The auto racing film received mixed reviews and grossed $158 million (over a $60 million budget). While the film was still a financial success, it did not match the success of Simpson and Bruckheimer’s previous films. The duo mutually parted with Paramount shortly thereafter.

In 1991, the two signed with Disney. Their first film for Disney, The Ref (1994), was a financial flop. Their following films, Dangerous Minds, Crimson Tide, and Bad Boys, all released in 1995, brought the pair back to success.

Frank Stanton

Frank Nicholas Stanton was an American broadcasting executive who served as the president of CBS between 1946 and 1971 and then as vice chairman until 1973. He also served as the chairman of the Rand Corporation from 1961 until 1967.

Martin Tahse

Martin Tahse is possibly most well known for his productions of Broadway shows that went on tour. With this, he became known for producing ABC’s after school specials.